www.to-zo.com

(and kubrick movies)

(and kubrick movies)

aleskot:

ZERO Vol. 2: At the Heart of It All comes out this Wednesday. For those of you who don’t know, Zero is a comics series/series of graphic novels I co-create with a whole lot of amazing artists, a rather ideal colorist, a rather ideal designer and a rather ideal letterer. The basic premise is "What would happen if James Bond existed?" and then it gets rather dark and complex. 

In advance of the second collection dropping in two days, we decided to share what we do for free, and therefore we present chapter nine.
Chapter nine is, as all other chapters so far, self-contained and simultaneously an important part of the larger whole. It’s set in 1993 Bosnia. It is, at least to me, the saddest issue of them all, and there’s a rather haunted quality to it. 
You can get it via:
The Image Comics Website
Comixology
iTunes
Google Play
Dropbox

And that’s it, I believe. The release is limited — you can only download it for a few days and then the links go dead or revert to pay-to-play. 
If you don’t have Zero vol. 1 and want to get it, there’s a multitude of options, including your local comic book store, bookstores (such as the tremendous McNally-Jackson bookstore in Soho, NY), Amazon, Comixology, iTunes, the Image Comics website and (probably) more. 
Welcome to Zero.

aleskot:

ZERO Vol. 2: At the Heart of It All comes out this Wednesday. For those of you who don’t know, Zero is a comics series/series of graphic novels I co-create with a whole lot of amazing artists, a rather ideal colorist, a rather ideal designer and a rather ideal letterer. The basic premise is "What would happen if James Bond existed?" and then it gets rather dark and complex. 

In advance of the second collection dropping in two days, we decided to share what we do for free, and therefore we present chapter nine.

Chapter nine is, as all other chapters so far, self-contained and simultaneously an important part of the larger whole. It’s set in 1993 Bosnia. It is, at least to me, the saddest issue of them all, and there’s a rather haunted quality to it. 

You can get it via:

The Image Comics Website

Comixology

iTunes

Google Play

Dropbox

And that’s it, I believe. The release is limited — you can only download it for a few days and then the links go dead or revert to pay-to-play. 

If you don’t have Zero vol. 1 and want to get it, there’s a multitude of options, including your local comic book store, bookstores (such as the tremendous McNally-Jackson bookstore in Soho, NY), Amazon, Comixology, iTunes, the Image Comics website and (probably) more. 

Welcome to Zero.

A few thoughts about fiction

     Like everybody else, I run into strange, but common assumptions about fiction every day - sometimes in reviews, sometimes in my own head. They happen automatically. These assumptions contaminate good thought quickly, ruin chances of any meaningful discussion, and slip away before you realize it. When you do catch one, even a momentary examination is both embarrassing and illuminating. Here’s some I see all the time, under one guise or another:

1) The assumption that the story is about providing you with answers, instead of questions.

2) The assumption that the author agrees with the characters’ actions, choices, opinions, thoughts, desires, likes and dislikes, fashion sense, or outlook on the world.

3) The assumption that every character represents something larger than themselves, such as age, gender, ethnicity, race, nation, religion, occupation, or any other group.

4) The assumption that any discernible lack - particularly of any of the groups mentioned above - is a deliberate political statement, or, at the very least, a showing of author’s unconscious “true colors”. In effect, that is—

5) The assumption that the story has to reflect the entire world, somehow.

6) The assumption that the author thinks the story is the best possible version of the story.

7) The assumption that the story is the author’s argument against all other (types of) stories.

8) The assumption that the logic of the story has to match the logic of the real world, instead of it’s own internal logic.

9) The assumption that the author has absolute and complete control, from initial idea to final complete form, and that there are no mistakes or oversights.

There’s more, and they are all hard (or impossible) to get rid of. For me at least — your experience might be different. I wouldn’t want to assume. Originally I wanted to write about these in more detail, but I decided to offer them like this, without further comment. Even if there are no solutions, just examining it should be useful enough.

T.

Sketches done for World Art Drop Day, September 2. Two of these have not yet been found — clues are hidden on my twitter account, @tozozozo.

A Fitzgerald book cover from last year — forgot to post this one.

A Fitzgerald book cover from last year — forgot to post this one.

(no particular purpose beyond trying out some brushpens)

(no particular purpose beyond trying out some brushpens)

Zero #9 cover animatic

Zero #9 cover animatic

process

maybe the third thing I’ve drawn for myself all this year

maybe the third thing I’ve drawn for myself all this year

Get the Lobster #4 cover process — out tomorrow!

Here’s a bit larger version of the Multiversity Hellboy piece— thanks for the amazing response, everyone — and here’s to 20 more years of Hellboy!

Here’s a bit larger version of the Multiversity Hellboy piece— thanks for the amazing response, everyone — and here’s to 20 more years of Hellboy!

Get the Lobster #4 (out in may)

Get the Lobster #4 (out in may)

Breaking Bad piece that was a part of Multiversity’s tribute to the show (here’s all of them). Not much ref needed for Heisenberg…

Breaking Bad piece that was a part of Multiversity’s tribute to the show (here’s all of them). Not much ref needed for Heisenberg…